FAQs

How should wiring be configured for paint booth lighting?

How should wiring be configured for paint booth lighting?

Your paint booth manufacturer can provide electrical schematics to use to properly configure the wiring for paint booth light fixtures. However, the electrical wiring to the booth and booth accessories must be completed by a qualified electrician. Installation must meet all applicable national, state and […]

What is the difference between having a three-row pit vs. a one-row pit in my automotive paint booth?

What is the difference between having a three-row pit vs. a one-row pit in my automotive paint booth?

Three-row exhaust pits are most useful for painting parts off a vehicle in an automotive paint booth. The wider the pit, the wider the spray zone. Three-row pits feature a four-part system that is designed to evenly draw air out of a paint booth, while capturing […]

What is the relationship between paint booth air velocity and paint gun pressure?

What is the relationship between paint booth air velocity and paint gun pressure?

Is there a rule of thumb or formula to determine or calculate spray booth air supply velocity w.r.t. the amount of paint required for a particular part?

Paint booth air velocity and paint gun pressure are independent of each other. Paint companies want 80 to 120 feet per minute of air velocity in a spray booth for their coatings to lay down and dry properly. Too much or too little airflow will have negative effects on the paint. Paint gun pressure recommendations vary greatly, depending on the type of coating being applied and the type of paint gun (i.e. help, rp, pressure pot, suction feed, etc.). The best place to find this information is the technical data sheet from the paint company — always start there first.

Which airflow style creates the cleanest paint job?

Which airflow style creates the cleanest paint job?

Pressurized downdraft airflow provides the cleanest paint jobs in a spray booth. Pressurized paint booths keep the cabin of the spray booth at a positive pressure, so no outside contaminants can make their way through a leaky seam or seal for dirt or dust to […]

If you are painting something large, like a truck, would overspray on the trail side of the air cause problems?

If you are painting something large, like a truck, would overspray on the trail side of the air cause problems?

Potentially, yes. A lot of large equipment businesses have switched to downdraft booths for that reason, as long as the product does not require the bottom to be painted. If you are having problems with overspray trailing off and ending up at the backside of […]

What is the best way to control relative humidity in paint applications?

What is the best way to control relative humidity in paint applications?

This depends on what you are spraying and the surface you are spraying on. There are a lot of waterborne paints that require low humidity to dry out the air and help them dry faster. It is best to reference the technical data sheet of the coating you are spraying. It will specify the desired humidity level, and there are ways to adjust the paint to react better to that humidity.

If you are spraying waterborne paint, the ideal temperature in your booth is 70 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit, or 5 degrees above ambient temperature. When your booth is above that outside temperature, the burner will intermittently turn on to burn out the humidity and lower the overall humidity level in the booth.

In hot, dry climates like Arizona, painters experience the opposite problem. When it is too dry, they will use misting devices in the intake ductwork to ensure the paint does not dry too fast.

Solvent-based coatings dry well on their own regardless of the humidity, and in some cases will dry faster with a higher humidity. Regardless, it is good to have a way of monitoring humidity in the paint booth.

Should you use tact-based coat before using clear?

Should you use tact-based coat before using clear?

Yes, for the most part. However, there are always exceptions. For instance, if you spray a fine mist as your last coat of base (seen with some waterborne paints in automotive refinish), tacking it could remove it. If you are spraying basecoat, you want to […]

What is the worst contamination/dirt scenario you have seen in a paint booth?

What is the worst contamination/dirt scenario you have seen in a paint booth?

We have seen a full range of paint booth contamination scenarios. Typically, when businesses put in new equipment, they also change a lot of other things in the shop, which can result in contamination in the spray booth. For example, one shop we worked with […]

How often do you see external factors affect the paint job?

How often do you see external factors affect the paint job?

We see it quite often in the industrial realm, since many people use open front paint spray booths, which pull air from the shop environment, or even from outside. This can often introduce contaminants into the paint booth. There are a lot of things to examine, such as the source of intake air and making sure your filters are clean. Replacing your filters on a routine basis, wearing a paint suit, wiping things down, blowing things off and not sanding in the booth are all practices that could help improve the quality of your paint finish.

However, you may run into weird situations occasionally that are out of your control. For instance, a shop once had fisheyes in their clear coat, which started around 10:30 a.m. every day. At the same time, the booth started smelling like fried food. When this shop installed their new paint booth, the exhaust stack was placed on the side of the building that faced a local KFC. Every day, when KFC started their fryers and exhausted the fumes, the shop’s paint booth sucked the fryer fumes into the airflow. If the shop kept the same filters in for more than a month, it would starts to saturate through the filters in the paint booth and ends up on the surface of the item they were painting, resulting in fisheyes. This could have been controlled by regularly changing the filters. It is also a good reminder to be conscious of everything around you, your booth and your shop.

What is your recommendation for filters in an open-front spray booth when using CARC paint?

What is your recommendation for filters in an open-front spray booth when using CARC paint?

We recommend GFS Wave® exhaust paint booth filters from Global Finishing Solutions®. They are polyester filters with a large surface volume. The ridges or “waves” on the filter media capture and retain overspray, acting as a 3D loading system. Flat exhaust filters get clogged very […]